(本館) (トップ) <(分館)
バートランド・ラッセルのポータルサイト用の日本語看板画像

『ラッセル自伝』(松下彰良・訳)

The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell, v.3

 前ページ 次ページ v.3,chap.2 (At home and abroad) 目次  Contents (総目次)

第3巻第2章 国の内外で


ラッセルの言葉366
 エディスも私も,それぞれの家系に語るべき'伝説'があった。ラッセル家の伝説は,ロンドン塔におけるアン・ブーリン(注:ヘンリー八世の2番目の妻。不義密通の罪に問われる)の死(刑死)の合図を馬上で見守っていた(注:on his Mount なぜ大文字なのか?)ヘンリー八世(1491-1547)とともに始まった。ラッセル家の始祖(創始者)はヘンリー八世の子分をしていた。我が家の伝説は,1815年に行なわれた祖父(注:John Russell, 1792-1878:1813年に初当選)の(英国議会での)演説まで続いた。祖父は,(ウォーターロー会戦の前)ナポレオンと対抗してはならないと主張した。その後,祖父はエルバ島に(島流しにあっていた)ナポレオンを訪ねた。ナポレオンは,祖父を愛想よく迎え,祖父の耳をつまんでひっぱった。その後はわが家の武勇談にもかなりの間空白があったが,最後にこういうことがあった。イラン国王が国賓として訪英しリッチモンド・パークに来たとき雨にあい,ペンブローク・ロッジに雨宿りせざるを得なかったことがあった。聞いたところによると,祖父がこんなに小さな家で申し訳ないと国王に言ったところ,それに答えて王がこう言ったそうである。「ええ,でも,この家には偉人が住んでいます。」
 私の祖母の意見によると,ペンブローク・ロッジから眺めるきわめて広大なテムズ河流域の景観が,突出している工場の煙突1本のためにだいなしにされていた。祖母はこの煙突のことを聞かれるといつも微笑をうかべながらこう答えていた。「ええ,あれは工場の煙突なんかではありません。ミドルセックス州の殉教者の記念塔です」。

 エディスの家系の伝説は,それを知った時,ラッセル家の伝説よりもずっとロマンティックであるように思われた。1640年頃にアメリカン・インディアンによって絞殺されたか拉致されたかしたある先祖の話/エディスの父がまだ幼い頃,一家が短期間ではあるがコロラドで開拓者としての生活をしていた時の,インディアンに囲まれていた時の父の冒険談/屋根裏が彼女の家族がフィラデルフィアでの議会に出席するためにニュー・イングランドから乗っていった馬のや同乗する婦人用の添え鞍でいっぱいだったという話/マサチューセッツ州ディア・フィールドにおける大虐殺の時にユーニス・ウィリアムズがインディアンに拉致され殺された附近の,岩だらけの流れでカヌーを操ったり水泳したりしたという話。その話はフェニモア・クーパーの著書のなかの1章にあったかも知れない。南北戦争に際してエディス家の人々は南北に分断された。二人の兄弟がいて,終戦に当たって,兄弟の一人である南軍の将軍は,北軍の将軍であった他の兄弟に武器を引き渡さなければならなかった。エディス自身は,ニューヨーク市で生まれ育った。当時のニューヨークは,彼女も記憶していたように,私の青年時代のニューヨークと非常によく似ていたように思われる。道路には丸石が敷きつめられ,ハンサム(注:一段高い御車台が後部にある二人乗り一頭立ての二輪馬車)が走り,自動車は一台も走っていなかった。

v.3,chap.2: At home and abroad

Edith and I each had family myths to relate. Mine began with Henry VIII, of whom the founder of my family had been a protégé, watching on his Mount for the signal of Anne Boleyn's death at the Tower. It continued to my grandfather's speech in 1815, urging (before Waterloo) that Napoleon should not be opposed. Next came his visit to Elba, in which Napoleon was affable and tweaked his ear. After this, there was a considerable gap in the saga, until the occasion when the Shah, on a State visit, was caught in the rain in Richmond Park and was compelled to take refuge in Pemroke Lodge. My grandfather (so I was told) apologised for its being such a small house, to which the Shah replied: 'Yes, but it contains a great man.' There was a very wide view of the Thames valley from Pembroke Lodge marred, in my grandmother's opinion, by a prominent factory chimney. When she was asked about this chimney, she used to reply, smiling: 'Oh, that's not a factory chimney, that's the monument to the Middlesex Martyr.'
Edith's family myths, as I came to know them, seemed to me far more romantic; an ancestor who in 1640 or thereabouts was either hanged or carried of by the Red Indians; the adventures of her father among the Indians when he was a little boy and his family for a short time lived a pioneering life in Colorado; attics full of pillions and saddles on which members of her family had ridden from New England to the Congress at Philadelphia; tales of canoeing and of swimming in rocky streams near where Eunice Williams, stolen away by the Indians in the great massacre at Deerfield, Massachusetts, was killed. It might have been a chapter from Fennimore Cooper. In the Civil War, Edith's people were divided between North and South Among them were two brothers, one of them (a Southern General) at the end had to surrender his sword to his brother, who was a Northern General. She herself had been born and brought up in New York City, which, as she remembered it, seemed very like the New York of my youth of cobbled streets and hansom cabs and no motor cars.
(掲載日:2009.08.18/更新日:2012.2.21)