(本館)  (トップ)  (分館)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



ラッセル「我々の時代のための哲学1 n.3 (松下彰良・訳)

Bertrand Russell : Philosophy for Our Time (1953)

前ページ(Forward) 次ページ(Forward)


 

様々な宇宙像

 過去の偉大な哲学者の体系(哲学者が構築した体系)を読むと、ある種の想像力を具えた人たちにとって良いものと思われたかなり多くの異なった宇宙像が存在していることに気づくだろう。なかには,この世界(宇宙)には心(精神)しか存在しておらず,物理的対象は,実際は,幻影である,と考える哲学者たちもいた。また物(物質)以外存在するものはなくく、我々が「心(精神)」と呼んでいるものは、ある種の物質の奇妙な行動様式にすぎないと考える哲学者たちもいた。私は,ここではいずれの世界観がより正しいか、またより望ましいか言いたいということには関心を持っていない。私が言いたいと関心をもっているのは、このような異なった世界像(宇宙像)を理解することが精神を伸張させ、新しくておそらく実り多い仮説をより受け入れ易くすることである。
 哲学が有していなければならない知的利用法がもうひとつあるが、この点では、失敗することが少なくない。哲学は、人間が誤り易いことについての認識を、また、教養のない人には疑う余地が無いと思われる多くの物事が不確実であることについての認識を,教えこむべきである。子供は、最初は、地球が円いことを信じることを拒否するだろうし、地球が平たく見えるということを強く主張するであろう。
 しかし、私の念頭にある種類の不確実性のもっと重要な適用は,社会組織や神学のようなものに関してである。我々が非個人的思考の習慣を身につけると、自分の国や自分の階級や自分の(信じている)宗派についての大衆の信念を、他国のそれらの信念を眺めるのと同様に,超越的に(公平に)眺めることができるだろう。最も堅く,最も熱烈に保持されている信念は、しばしば,最も(それを信じるべき)証拠の少いものである,ということを発見するであろう。人間のある大集団がAを信じ、他の大集団がBを信していれば、どちらの集団も,他の集団はあまりにも馬鹿げたことを信じていると言って,相手の集団を憎むという傾向がある。
 この傾向に対する最善の治療法証拠にもとづいて進む習慣であり、証拠のないときには確信しない(確信を差し控える)という習慣である。これは,神学的あるいは政治的信念についてばかりでなく、社会的慣習についてもあてはまる。人類学の研究によれば,驚くほど多様な社会的慣習が存在すること、また、人間性に反しているように思われる慣習をもった社会が持続できることを示している。この種の知識は、互いに敵対する独断主義が人類をおびやかす主要な危険となっている現代(我々の時代)においては、特に、その解毒剤として貴重である。



Different Pictures of the Universe

If you read the systems of the great philosophers of the past you will find that there are a number of different pictures of the universe which have seemed good to men with a certain kind of imagination. Some have thought that there is nothing in the world but mind, that physical objects are really phantoms. Others have thought that there is nothing but matter, and that what we call "mind" is only an odd way in which certain kinds of matter behave. I am not at the moment concerned to say that any one of these ways of viewing the world is more true or otherwise more desirable than another. What I am concerned to say is that practice in appreciating these different world pictures stretches the mind and makes it more receptive of new and perhaps fruitful hypotheses.
There is another intellectual use which philosophy ought to have, though in this respect it not infrequently fails. It ought to inculcate a realization of human fallibility and of the uncertainty of many things which to the uneducated seem indubitable. Children at first will refuse to believe that the earth is round and will assert passionately that they can see that it is flat.
But the more important applications of the kind of uncertainty that I have in mind are in regard to such things as social systems and theologies. When we have acquired the habit of impersonal thinking we shall be able to view the popular beliefs of our own nation, our own class, or our own religious sect with the same detachment with which we view those of others. We shall discover that the beliefs that are held most firmly and most passionately are very often those for which there is least evidence. When one large body of men believes A, and another large body of men believes B, there is a tendency of each body to hate the other for believing anything so obviously absurd.
The best cure for this tendency is the practice of going by the evidence, and forgoing certainty where evidence is lacking. This applies not only to theological and political beliefs but also to social customs. The study of anthropology shows that an amazing variety of social customs exists, and that societies can persist with habits that might be thought contrary to human nature. This kind of knowledge is very valuable as an antidote to dogmatism, especially in our own day when rival dogmatisms are the chief danger that threatens mankind.
(掲載日:2015.02.23/更新日:)