(本館)  (トップ)  (分館)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



The Conquest of Happiness(松下彰良・訳)

Back Next  Part I(Causes of Unhappiness), Chap.6:Envy   Contents(総目次)

 普通の尊敬すべき女性たちの間においても,'ねたみ'は,並はずれて大きな役割を果たしている。もしあなたが地下鉄の電車に座っていて,偶然良い身なりの女性が車内を歩いている(のに遭遇した)場合,他の女性たちの視線に注意してみるとよい。きっと,彼女たちの誰もが--もっと身なりの良い女性たちは例外かもしれないが--その女性に'悪意のある視線'を浴びせ,相手の価値を傷つけるような結論(推論)をひきだそうとやっきになっているのがわかるだろう。スキャンダル好きは,こうした一般的な悪意の1つの表れである。他の女性をけなす話(うわさ)は,どんなにとるに足らない証拠でも,即座に信じられる。高尚な道徳も,同じ目的に役立っている。つまり,高尚な道徳に背き,たまたま罪を犯すチャンスのあった人たちはねたまれ,罪を犯した彼らをその罪ゆえに罰するのは'美徳'であるとされる。この特別な形態の美徳(罪を犯した人を罰すること)は,確かに,それ自体が報酬となる(他人を罰すること自体が楽しい)
 しかし,まったく同じことが男性の間にも観察される。違うのは,ただ,女性はほかのすべての女性を競争相手と見るのに対して,男性は概して,同じ職業の他の男性に対してのみこの感情をいだく,という点である。本書の読者で,ある芸術家のことを別の芸術家の前で(←~に対して;に向かい合って;~に比べて)ほめるという軽率(無分別)なことをしたことがあるだろうか,ある政治家を同じ政党に属する別の政治家の前でほめたことがあるだろうか,(また)あるエジプト学者を別のエジプト学者の前でほめたことがあるだろうか。もしあるなら,ほぼ100%(十中八九),嫉妬(しっと)の嵐を引き起こしたはずである。
 ライプニッツ(Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, 1646-1716)とホイヘンス( Christian Huygens1629-1695)との(往復)書簡の中に,ニュートンが発狂したという噂について嘆いているものが何通かある。「悲しいことではないだろうか,」--2人はお互い書いているが--「ニュートン氏の比類なき天才が,理性の喪失によって曇らされたなんて・・・。」 そして,この2人の著名人は,次々と手紙を書き,明らかに面白がって,'空涙'(←ワニの涙/ワニは餌を食べながら涙を流す,という伝説から)を流していた。実際は,2人が偽善的に嘆いていた出来事は起こっておらず,ただ,(ニュートンの)奇矯な2,3の行動の実例が,そのような噂を立たせたのである。
* From Free animation library
https://www.animationlibrary.com/a-l/

Among average respectable women envy plays an extraordinarily large part. If you are sitting in the underground and a well-dressed woman happens to walk along the car, watch the eyes of the other women. You will see that every one of then, with the possible exception of those who are better dressed, will watch the woman with malevolent glances, and will be struggling to draw inferences derogatory to her. The love of scandal is an expression of this general malevolence: any story against another woman is instantly believed, even on the flimsiest evidence. A lofty morality serves the same purpose: those who have a chance to sin against it are envied, and it is considered virtuous to punish them for their sins. This particular form of virtue is certainly its own reward.
Exactly the same thing, however, is to be observed among men, except that women regard all other women as their competitors, whereas men as a rule only have this feeling towards other men in the same profession. Have you, reader, ever been so imprudent as to praise an artist to another artist? Have you ever praised a politician to another politician of the same party? Have you ever praised an Egyptologist to another Egyptologist? If you have, it is a hundred to one that you will have produced an explosion of jealousy.
In the correspondence of Leibniz and Huyghens there are a number of letters lamenting the supposed fact that Newton had become insane. 'Is it not sad,' they write to each other, 'that the incomparable genius of Mr. Newton should have become overclouded by the loss of reason?' And these two eminent men, in one letter after another, wept crocodile tears with obvious relish. As a matter of fact, the event which they were hypocritically lamenting had not taken place, though a few examples of eccentric behaviour had given rise to the rumour.