(本館)  (トップ)  (分館)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



The Conquest of Happiness(松下彰良・訳)

Back Next  Part I(Causes of Unhappiness), Chap.5:Fatigue   Contents(総目次へ)
 自ら変えることができない法律や制度のもとで暮らしている'私的な一個人'にとって,抑圧的なモラリストたちが作り出し永続化している状況に対抗することは困難である。しかし,刺激的な快楽は'幸福に至る道'ではないと理解(認識)することは価値がある。ただし,より満足できる喜びが手に入らないものである以上,興奮の助けを借りずに人生に耐えることはほとんど不可能である,と考える人がいるかもしれない。このような状況において,分別のある人間ができる唯一のことは,快楽の供給を制限し,健康を害したり仕事にさしつかえるほどの疲労をもたらすような過度の快楽を,自分に与えないことである。
 若者の悩みごとの根本的な治療は,社会のモラル(倫理・道徳)を変革することにある。社会のモラルが変わるまでは,若い人は,次のように考えるのが良い。即ち,自分もいずれ結婚する(境遇になる)だろうし,また幸福な結婚を不可能にするような生活の仕方--それは神経の消耗や穏やかな快楽を楽しむ能力の喪失によって容易に起こるが--をするのは賢明ではないだろう,と。
 神経疲労の最悪の特徴の一つは,神経疲労は人と外界をへだてる一種のスクリーンの働きをすることである。さまざまな印象が,いわば,布につつまれ,音を消されて,彼のところに到達する。彼はもはや,ちょっとしたいたずらや気に障る他人の癖によっていらいらさせられる場合を除いて,他人に注意を払おうとはしない。食事からも日光からも,なんの喜びも引き出せず,ただ,2,3の事柄に関心が集中し,他のあらゆるものに無関心になる。こういう状態では,休息などできなくなり,絶えず疲労が蓄積し,ついには,医者の治療が必要となる。こういうことは,根本的には,前の章で触れた,あの「大地」との接触を失ったことに対する罰である。しかし,現代の大都布のように膨大な人口が集まっているような状況において,どうやってそういう大地との接触を保つことができるかは,決して明らかではない。しかしながら,ここでまた私たちは,本書では扱うつもりのない,大きな社会問題の周辺に我々はたどり着いていることを発見するのである。
From Free animation library
https://www.animationlibrary.com/a-l/

For the private individual, who cannot alter the laws and institutions under which he lives, it is difficult to cope with the situation that oppressive moralists created and perpetuate. It is, however, worth while to realise that exciting pleasures are not a road to happiness, although so long as more satisfying joys remain unattainable a man may find it hardly possible to endure life except by the help of excitement. In such a situation the only thing that a prudent man can do is to ration himself, and not to allow himself such an amount of fatiguing pleasure as will undermine his health or interfere with his work. The radical cure for the troubles of the young lies in a change of public morals. In the meantime a young man does well to reflect that he will ultimately be in a position to marry, and that he will be unwise if he lives in such a way as to make a happy marriage impossible, which may easily happen through frayed nerves and an acquired incapacity for the gentler pleasures.
One of the worst features of nervous fatigue is that it acts as a sort of screen between a man and the outside world. Impressions reach him, as it were, muffled and muted; he no longer notices people except to be irritated by small tricks or mannerisms; he derives no pleasure from his meals or from the sunshine, but tends to become tensely concentrated upon a few objects and indifferent to all the rest. This state of affairs makes it impossible to rest, so that fatigue continually increases until it reaches a point where medical treatment is required. All this is at bottom a penalty for having lost that contact with Earth of which we spoke in the preceding chapter. But how such contact is to be preserved in our great modern urban agglomerations of population, it is by no means easy to see. However, here again we find ourselves upon the fringe of large social questions with which in this volume it is not my intention to deal.