(本館)  (トップ)  (初心者のページ)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



バートランド・ラッセル(著),中村秀吉(訳)『哲学の諸問題』
(社会思想社,初版=1966年/新版=1996年。214pp. 教養文庫 n.1586)

(原著: The Problems of Philosophy, 1912)
第1章「外見と実在」n.1  
Appearance and Reality, n.1  目次

 一応理屈のわかる人なら誰にも疑えないほど確かな知識というものがこの世にあるものでしょうか。一見やさしそうなこの問題は,実はあらゆる問題のなかでもっともむずかしいものの一つなのです。直載(ちょくさい)で確信のある答を妨げるものがあるということを知ったとき,わたしたちは哲学の研究を始めているのです。というのは,哲学とは,このような,問題をむずかしくするすべてのものを探り,わたしたちの日常観念のものにあるすべての漠然さと混乱とを知った上で,日常生活において,また科学においてさえも犯す不注意や独断を避けて,批判的にこのような究極的な問題に答えるくわだてにすぎないからです。
 わたしたちは日常生活で多くのものを確かであるように扱いますが,よくしらべてみるとそれらは明らかな矛盾に満ちていて,多くの思索をめぐらせてやっと本当に信じてよいものを知ることができるのです。確実なものをつきとめるにはわたしたちの現在の経験から出発するのが自然ですし,またある意味で疑いもなく,知識は現在の経験から導き出されます。しかしわたしたちの直接経験が知らせるものについての言明は,どれも大変まちがいやすいものです。わたしはいま椅子に坐り,ある形をした机に向かい,その上にある,ものを書いたか印刷したかしてある数枚の紙を見ているように思われます。頭をめぐらすと,わたしは建物や雲や太陽を窓の外に見ます。太陽は地球から約9,300万マイル離れており,地球より何倍も大きい熱球であり,地球の自転によって毎朝昇り,これからもかぎりない時間にわたって昇りつづけることを,わたしは信じています。だれか正常な知覚をもった人がわたしの部屋にはいると,かれは同じ椅子,机,本,紙をわたしが見るように見るし,わたしの見る机はわたしが手に抵抗を感ずる机と同じであることを信じています。これらすべてのことはまことに明らかにみえるものですから,わたしの知力を疑う人に答えるとき以外には,述べるまでもないように思われます。ですがこれらすべては合理的疑えるので,そのどれもわたしたちがまったく正しい形式で述べたと確信できるためには,多くの注意深い論議を要するのです。

 IS THERE ANY KNOWLEDGE in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? This question, which at first sight might not seem difficult, is really one of the most difficult that can be asked. When we have realized the obstacles in the way of a straightforward and confident answer, we shall be well launched on the study of philosophy - for philosophy is merely the attempt to answer such ultimate questions, not carelessly and dogmatically, as we do in ordinary life and even in the sciences, but critically, after exploring all that makes such questions puzzling, and after realizing all the vagueness and confusion that underlie our ordinary ideas.
 In daily life, we assume as certain many things which, on a closer scrutiny, are found to be so full of apparent contradictions that only a great amount of thought enables us to know what it is that we really may believe. In the search for certainty, it is natural to begin with our present experiences, and in some sense, no doubt, knowledge is to be derived from them. But any statement as to what it is that our immediate experiences make us know is very likely to be wrong. It seems to me that I am now sitting in a chair, at a table of a certain shape, on which I see sheets of paper with writing or print. By turning my head I see out of the window buildings and clouds and the sun. I believe that the sun is about ninety-three million miles from the earth; that it is a hot globe many times bigger than the earth ; that, owing to the earth's rotation, it rises every morning, and will continue to do so for an indefinite time in the future. I believe that, if any other normal person comes into my room, he will see the same chairs and tables and books and papers as I see, and that the table which I see is the same as the table which I feel pressing against my arm. All this seems to be so evident as to be hardly worth stating, except in answer to a man who doubts whether I know anything. Yet all this may be reasonably doubted, and all of it requires much careful discussion before we can be sure that we have stated it in a form that is wholly true.