(本館)  (トップ)  (分館)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



The Conquest of Happiness(松下彰良・訳)

Back Next  Part I(Causes of Unhappiness), Chap.3:Competition   Contents(総目次へ)
 '破産'の結果に関する,本物ではあるが'不合理な恐れ'という要素が,ビジネスマンの不安や心配事の中にしばしば入り込んでくることは認められなければならないだろう。アーノルド・ベネット(Enoch Arnold Bennett, 1867-1931)のクレイハンガーは,金持ちになったにもかかわらず,救貧院で死ぬことを(死ぬかも知れないと)恐れ続けた。子供時代を通して貧乏にひどく苦しんだ経験のある人は,わが子も同様に苦しむのではないかという恐怖にとりつかれ,この災害に対する砦(防波堤)として'十分な'お金をためることはほとんど不可能である,という気持ちになるのは,疑いもないことであろう。こういう恐怖は,たぶん一世代(自分の子供の世代)では避けがたいものかもしれないが,それらの恐怖が,一度もひどい貧乏を経験したことのない人々を苦しめることは,より少なくなりそうである。いずれにせよ,このような恐怖は,この(競争)問題の中では小さい,いくらか例外的な要素にすぎない。
 この災いの根元は,幸福の主な源泉として'競争にうち勝つこと(立身出世すること)'を強調しすぎることにある。成功感が,生活をよりエンジョイしやすくすることは,私も否定はしない。たとえば,若いうちずっと無名であった(←目立たなかった)画家は,才能が世に認められれば,以前よりも幸福になる傾向がある。また,金銭も,ある点までは幸福を非常に増進できるものであることを,私は否定しない。(しかし)その限界を越えれば,幸福をより増進するとは思えない。私が主張したいのは,成功は幸福(になるため)一つの要素にしかなりえず,成功を得るために他の要素がすべて犠牲にされたとすれば,あまりにも高い代価を支払って手に入れたことになる,ということである。
 この災いのもとは,実業界(ビジネスの世界)一般に行き渡っている人生観にある。ヨーロッパには,確かに,実業界以外にも威信を持った階級・利益集団・グループがまだ存在する。一部の国には,貴族階級があり,すべての国に,知識階級があり,少数の小国を除くすべての国では,陸海軍の軍人が非常に尊敬されている。ところで,その人の職業が何であろうと,成功の中に競争という要素があることは確かであるが,同時に,尊敬の対象となるのは,ただ'成功したということ'ではなく,中身はどのようなものであれ,'成功をもたらした卓越した資質',である。科学者は,金持ちになるかもしれないし,ならないかもしれない。しかし,財をなすほうが,そうでない場合よりも(科学者として)より尊敬されるということはないことは,確かである。著名な将軍や提督が貧乏だとわかっても,誰も驚きはしない。実際,こういう境遇での貧しさは,ある意味では,それ自体1つの名誉である。このような理由で,ヨーロッパでは,純粋に蓄財のために競争し戦っているのは,一部の階級だけに限られており,また,そういう人たちは,たぶん社会的に最も有力でも,最も尊敬されている階級・グループであるわけでもない。
 アメリカでは,事情が異なる。軍隊は,アメリカ人の尺度では,国民生活に影響を及ぼすほどの役割を持っていない。知識階級について言えば,ある医者が本当に医学のことをよく知っているかどうか,あるいは,ある弁護土が本当に法律のことをよく知っているかどうか,部外者には全然わからないので,それゆえ,彼らの優秀さを判断するには,彼らの生活水準から推定される収入によるほうが容易である。大学教授について言えば,彼らは実業家たちに金で雇われた使用人であり,そういうものとして,もっと(歴史の)古い国々で与えられているほどの尊敬を受けていない。以上のような結果,アメリカでは,知的職業にたずさわる人は,実業家のまねをし,ヨーロッパにおけるように独自のタイプをなしていない。それゆえ,アメリカには,富裕階級のすべてにおいて,金銭的な成功のための露骨な容赦ない闘いを緩和するものは,何ひとつ存在しない。  
 

アメリカ人が好む,競争社会アメリカを象徴する
スポーツ(アメリカン・フットボール)

* From Free animation library :http://www.animationlibrary.com/a-l/

I think it should be admitted that an element of genuine though irrational fear as to the consequences of ruin frequently enters into a businessman's anxieties. Arnold Bennett's Clayhanger, however rich he became, continued to be afraid of dying in the workhouse. I have no doubt that those who have suffered greatly through poverty in their childhood, are haunted by terrors lest their children should suffer similarly, and feel that it is hardly possible to build up enough millions as a bulwark against this disaster. Such fears are probably inevitable in the first generation, but they are less likely to afflict those who have never known great poverty. They are in any case a minor and somewhat exceptional factor in the problem.
The root of the trouble springs from too much emphasis upon competitive success as the main source of happiness. I do not deny that the feeling of success makes it easier to enjoy life. A painter, let us say, who has been obscure throughout his youth, is likely to become happier if his talent wins recognition. Nor do I deny that money, up to a certain point, is very capable of increasing happiness; beyond that point, I do not think it does so. What I do maintain is that success can only be one ingredient in happiness, and is too dearly purchased if all the other ingredients have been sacrificed to obtain it.
The source of this trouble is the prevalent philosophy of life in business circles. In Europe, it is true, there are still other circles that have prestige. In some countries there is an aristocracy; in all there are the learned professions, and in all but a few of the smaller countries the army and the navy enjoy great respect. Now while it is true that there is a competitive element in success no matter what a man's profession may be, yet at the same time the kind of thing that is respected is not just success, but that excellence, whatever that may be, to which success has been due. A man of science may or may not make money; he is certainly not more respected if he does than if he does not. No one is surprised to find an eminent general or admiral poor; indeed, poverty in such circumstances is, in a sense, itself an honour. For these reasons, in Europe, the purely monetary competitive struggle is confined to certain circles, and those perhaps not the most influential or the most respected.
In America the matter is otherwise. The Services play too small a part in the national life for their standards to have any influence. As for the learned professions, no outsider can tell whether a doctor really knows much medicine, or whether a lawyer really knows much law, and it is therefore easier to judge of their merit by the income to be inferred from their standard of life. As for professors, they are the hired servants of businessmen, and as such will less respect than is accorded to them in older countries. The consequence of all this is that in America the professional man imitates the businessman, and does not constitute a separate type as he does in Europe. Throughout the well-to-do classes, therefore, there is nothing to mitigate the bare, undiluted fight for financial success.