B.ラッセルのポータルサイト

ラッセル「究極的価値判断」

出典:牧野力(編)『ラッセル思想辞典

Source: Education and the Social Order, 1932, chat. 15: Propaganda in Education

 下記は牧野力氏による要旨訳に少し手を入れ、英文を追加したものです。

 一般普通教育宣伝の機会を増大させた。今や宣伝は今までに持てなかったほどの重要性をもってきている。・・・
 教育における宣伝は、(失敗する特別な理由や事情がなければ)通常はその目的を達成する(注:牧野氏の要旨訳では「"常に"目的を達成する」となってしまっている)。(即ち,通常は)大部分の人たちは、彼らが育つ社会の宗教や,学校で学ぶ愛国心,を受け入れる。・・・本能に訴える要素を混入させ、集団感情を刺激することによって、この上ない効果をあげることができる。・・・恐らく、集団心理学が完成した暁には、政府が国民に信じ込ませることに限界はなくなるであろう。
 宣伝は、価値(価値判断の問題)、一般命題、事実問題の三点に関連しているかも知れない。それぞれいくらか異なる考察(consideration)が適用される。
 究極的な価値判断というものは(論理的に)議論が可能な問題ではない。・・・
 実生活における究極的な価値(判断)の問題は、今まで純枠に論理的にはほとんど考えられたことがない。それは人々が何をなすべきかだけを問題にしているからである。ある行為をなすべきか否かは、(1)行為の結果がどんなものでありうるか、(2)その結果は全体として妥当か否か、の二点で決まる。より精密に言えば、その行為者(注:政府などの組織体も含む)が置かれた状況の下で可能な別の結果と対比して、果してより妥当であるか否か、ということである。この二つの問いの中で、前者は科学的な問いであり理性的な検討に耐えうるが、倫理的な問いではない。論争で論理的な可能性を欠くのは、「何をなすべきか」についての論争が第二の問いに関連する場合だけである。
 政治的議論では名目上の点と実質的な点とが不一致を起しやすい。

( Universal education has increased immesurably the opportunities of propaganda. ... As this instance shows, propaganda has now an importance that it never had before.
Propaganda in education is usually successful in its object, unless there is some special reason for failure. The great majority of mankind accept the religion in which they were brought up, and the patriotism that they learnt at school... If propaganda is to succeed, it must inculcate something which makes some kind of instinctive appeal; in that case, it can enormously increase the virulence of group feeling. ... perhaps, when mass psychology has been perfected, there will be no limit to what governments can make their subjects believe.
Propaganda may be concerned with values, or with general propositions, or with matters of fact. Somewhat different considerations apply to these three cases. ...
Ultimate values are not matters as to which argument is possible. ...
As to ultimate values, men may agree or disagree, they may fight with guns or with ballot-papers but they cannot reason logically.) ...
In practical life, questions as to ultimate values hardly ever arise in their logical purity, since men are concerned with what should be done. Whether an act should be performed depends upon two considerations: first, what its effects are likely to be; second, whether these effects are on the whole good or, more accurately, whether, on the balance, they are better than the effects of any other act which is possible in the circumstance. Of these two questions, the first is scientific, not ethical and is amenable to rational argument, like every other scientific questions, It is only when a dispute as to what should be done turns on the second question that there is no theoretical pssibility of deciding it by argument. ...