(本館)  (トップ)  (分館)

Portal Site for Russellian in Japan



The Conquest of Happiness(松下彰良・訳)

Back Next  Part I(Causes of Unhappiness), Chap.8:Persecution Mania   Contents(総目次)
* 右上イラスト出典:B. Russell's The Good Citizen's Alphabet, 1953.

 最も一般的な不合理の形の一つは,悪意のあるゴシップ(噂話)
に対してほぼすべての人がとる態度である。知人について,時には友人についてさえ,意地悪いことを言わずにいられる人は,実に少ない。それにもかかわらず,人は,誰かが自分の悪口を言ったということを耳にすると,怒りと驚きでいっぱいになる。彼らがほかのすべての人の噂話をするように,ほかのすべての人も,彼らの噂話をするということをどうやら彼らは考えたことがないらしい。これは,穏やかな形の態度であるが,誇張された形になると,'被害妄想'に至る。私たちは,自分自身に対して感じている'あの優しい愛'と'あの深い尊敬(の念)'を,ほかのすべての人も感じてくれることを期待する。私たちが他人を評価する以上に,他人が私たちをより立派な人間だと考える(評価する)ことなど期待できないということは,私たちは,心(頭)に浮かばない。なぜ浮かんでこないかというと,その理由は,自分の長所はすばらしく明白であるが,他人の長所は,少しでもあるとしても,非常に'慈悲深い目'にしか見えないからである。誰それがあなたの悪口を言ったという話を耳にすると,あなたは,この上なく公平で,十分彼にふさわしい批評を'口に出すのを控えた'99回のことは思い出すが,彼についての真実だと信じていることを,'うっかりして断言(明言)した'100回目のことは忘れてしまっているのである。これが,長いこと我慢してきた報いだとでもいうのか,とあなたは感じる。しかし,彼の視点からみれば,あなたの行為は,彼の行為があなたに映ったのとまったく同じように映っているのだ。彼は,あなたがしゃべらなかった(99回の)ことはまったく知らない。彼が知っているのは,あなたが実際にしゃべった100回目のことだけである。もし,私たちがみんな,魔法によってお互いの考えを読みとる力を与えられたとしたら,その最初の効果は,ほとんどすべての友情は解消されるだろうということだと思われる。しかし,第2の効果は,すばらしいものかもしれない。なぜなら,友人が一人もいない世界は耐えがたいと感じられるだろうし,そうして,私たちがお互い完全無欠とは思っていないということを自らに隠しておくための幻想のヴェールの必要性もなく,お互いを好きになれるはずだからである。私たちは,我々の友人たちは欠点はあるが,全体的に見れば,好意を持てる,感じのいい人たちであることを知っている。しかし,彼らが私たちに対して同じ態度をとるのは耐えられないという自分を発見する。私たちは,その他の人間と異なり,私たちには欠点などないと,友人たちが思ってくれることを期待する。私たちに欠点があることを認めざるを得ない場合,私たちは,この明白な事実について,あまりにも深刻に考えすぎる。いかなる人間も,完全であることを期待すべきではなく,また,完全でないという事実について,不当に悩むべきではない。

One of the most universal forms of irrationality is the attitude taken by practically everybody towards malicious gossip. Very few people can resist saying malicious things about their acquaintances, and even on occasion about their friends; yet when people hear that anything has been said against themselves, they are filled with indignant amazement. It has apparently never occurred to them that, just as they gossip about everyone else, so everyone else gossips about them. This is a mild form of the attitude which, when exaggerated, leads on to persecution mania. We expect everybody else to feel towards us that tender love and that profound respect which we feel towards ourselves. It does not occur to us that we cannot expect others to think better of us than we think of them and the reason this does not occur to us is that our own merits are great and obvious, whereas those of others, if they exist at all, are only visible to a very charitable eye. When you hear that so-and-so has said something horrid about you, you remember the ninety-nine times when you have refrained from uttering the most just and well-deserved criticism of him, and forget the hundredth time when in an unguarded moment you have declared what you believe to be the truth about him. Is this the reward, you feel, for all your long forbearance? Yet from his point of view your conduct appears exactly what his appears to you; he knows nothing of the times when you have not spoken, he knows only of the hundredth time when you did speak. If we were all given by magic the power to read each other's thoughts I suppose the first effect would be that almost all friendships would be dissolved; the second effect, however, might be excellent, for a world without any friends would be felt to be intolerable, and we should learn to like each other without needing a veil of illusion to conceal from ourselves that we did not think each other absolutely perfect. We know that our friends have their faults, and yet are on the whole agreeable people whom we like. We find it, however, intolerable that they should have the same attitude towards us. We expect them to think that, unlike the rest of mankind, we have no faults. When we are compelled to admit that we have faults, we take this obvious fact far too seriously. Nobody should expect to be prefect, or be unduly troubled by the fact that he is not.

(掲載日:2005.09.07/更新日:2010.4.7)